There are many of us who can’t look past just how good sex is when it’s happening alongside cannabis. There is a special deliciousness in the cannabis-enhanced sex experience. Perhaps it’s all the added sensitivity of touch or maybe it’s the creative imagination that comes with cannabis. It could be because spooning naked after sex when you’re still high just feels so good.

But that doesn’t mean all cannabis is conducive to sex. Almost every cannabis enthusiast has been there — smoked a too-strong indica and fell asleep before anything ever got sexy. Some strains just aren’t a good prelude to sex. Others are the perfect prelude to sex.

But have you ever wondered if there are different cannabis products for different kinds of sex? It’s a thing, although it might be a slightly impractical thing given that it’s hard to tell what kind of sex you’re going to have before it’s happening — especially if it’s with someone you’ve never done it with before.

You can tailor your cannabis and sex experience in a multitude of different ways. Different strains will elicit different feelings, but different products will also play into the mix at different stages during the sex experience. For example, a CBD-infused massage oil could be a good place to start followed by an edible or a vape. You could end the whole experience by soaking in a CBD-infused bath.

The creative possibilities are endless, but we’ll leave the creativity to you. In this article, we’re showing you the best cannabis strains and products to use for sex. 

1. Girl Scout Cookies Vape Cart.

Ahh, Girl Scout Cookies (a.k.a. GSC), the famous staple strain that so many cannabis enthusiasts love. It’s no wonder they love it since it makes the body tingly in all the right ways. Whether it’s for solo sex or partnered sex, Girl Scout Cookies is sensual and physical.

It’s a hybrid that leans towards indica, making it a slow moving high that’s centred in the body. It’s the perfect strain for sensual self play or for intimacy with a lover. Girl Scout Cookies’ effects wash over the body in euphoric waves. On top of this, the creativity effects of GSC can make for a sex experience that’s new and exciting.

Girl Scout Cookies also has higher than normal levels of CBD and CBN, making it more balanced than other strains — perfect for sex!

Get it at the My Supply Co. pantry here.

2. Honey Rose Vape Cart

Romantic couple kissing silhouette

Because sometimes, sex needs a little romance. It’s a bit too easy to lose the romance in the 21st century thanks to Tinder and other online dating platforms. But cannabis can help.

This special formula by Kloud 9 Extracts is made for sensuality and romance. With smokey notes of honey and and the aroma of rose, this product is designed to arouse all of your senses, and not just your body.

The Honey Rose Vape is a great product to use in anticipation of romantic sex, such as with a partner or somebody who you aren’t afraid to explore romance with. This product is more in line with enhancing what inspires great sex like all the foreplay and long eye contact.

We recommend inviting the Honey Rose Vape early in the night so you and your partner can keep revisiting it as you get romantic!

Get it at the My Supply Co. pantry here.

3. White Siberian. 

A black and white image of girls making love on bed sheets

What’s typically a pain-killing strain is also a cannabis strain for great sex. What makes White Siberian perfect for sex? It has a really fat CBD content which lets the mind-body experience come together a bit more seamlessly than with high THC weed.

This is a great strain for getting sexy with another person as it’s perfectly balanced in physical and mental effects. It’s euphoric but relaxing but also physically soothing. It’s not too cerebral but it’s not too lazy.

White Siberian is a good strain if you want to spend hours making love because as it tapers down, it leaves you with a deep sense of satisfaction and physical laziness. After hours of love making, nothing is better than naked cuddles — the state of existence in which all of life’s problems get solved.

Get it at the My Supply Co. pantry here.

4. Gorilla Glue #4

Gorilla Glue #4 is just as mysterious as sex itself. It’s a sativa dominant hybrid that feels like an indica in the best possible way. It doesn’t make you sleepy but excites all of your innocence and curiosity. It’s the kind of strain that makes sex really fun, as though you were doing it all for the first time again.

This strain brings about a velvety softness to the muscles and the cerebrals, making it more body-focused than mind-focused. At the same time, Gorilla Glue #4 is famous for bringing the giggles into a situation, making sex fun, light-hearted, and centred around pleasure.

There’s nothing to say that curious, sexy fun can’t happen alone, so Gorilla Glue #4 swings both ways, you could say. Whether it’s with a partner or completely solo, Gorilla Glue #4 makes for a more light-hearted sexual experience.

Get it at the My Supply Co. pantry here.

5. 1:1 CBD:THC Cara-Melts

A couple uses food as foreplay and romance

There are some people who think food doesn’t go with sex, but we disagree. There’s something really sexual about decadent flavours like chocolate and caramel. There’s something sexy about feeding your lover something sexy like caramel. It must be why these 1:1 Cara-Melts exist.

They’re balanced in terms of cannabinoids, so that’s a win. You can also suck on them while they melt in your mouth — and that’s definitely another win.

The Cara-Melts are a good invitation to the bedroom that’s been feeling a little boring lately. Who says feeding your partner a cannabinoid-rich caramel candy isn’t good foreplay? These edibles are a good cannabis option for those who find THC a little too overwhelming — the CBD helps calm that down and keep things even. It means stoned sex can be fun sex even if you’re a little shy of cannabis.

Get them at the My Supply Co. pantry here.

Cannabis and sex go hand in hand when they’re done right, and just like there are different strains for different moods, there are different strains for different sex! 

We loved compiling this list of our favourite sex products in the My Supply Co. pantry. Which ones have you tried? Let us know in the comments!

Whether you’re enhancing the intimate connection you have with your partner or exploring the boundaries of sex with someone you’re not committed to, sex is one of the most beautiful of all human experiences. Or at least, that’s how everybody talks about it and that’s how everybody wants it to be — even though it’s not that way for everybody. For a lot of people, cannabis is a way to help the passion back into the bedroom.

There are a lot of cannabis users who rave about the impact of cannabis use on their sex lives — and there’s also a lot of research that even suggests a biological mechanism for it. But there’s the other side of the coin like there always is. Those who use cannabis frequently or who report being addicted to cannabis might even experience low libido.

In another scenario all together — if you’re just way too stoned, then having sex might feel funny, awkward, or not at all pleasurable. You might not even get there, if you know what I mean.

As an herbalist, I think using cannabis around sex is a great way to bring something new to intimacy. But cannabis, like any intoxicant, can come between two people in a relationship,  depending on how it’s used. When cannabis becomes a third wheel in a sexual relationship, it’s just that — and it isn’t fun.

So with that in mind, let’s have a look at some of the ways cannabis works for and against your sex life.

Cannabis, relaxation and getting in the groove

A couple is intimate, lying in bed together

Arguably one of the most common things standing between people and good sex is insecurity or tension. In one study, researchers even concluded that loneliness and depression played a major role in the pain experienced by women during sexual intercourse. 

Your sex life isn’t jumping when there’s no one to do it with. But your sex life also isn’t jumping if you can’t enjoy sex, even if there’s a huge line of people waiting to do it with you. This is where cannabis can really work for your sex life.

In a 2019 study published in Sexual Medicine, researchers found that many women reported decreased pain during sexual intercourse after using cannabis. Now, we don’t know why that’s the case, but we can speculate. 

Increased relaxation, which is also associated with less tension, might be why some women experienced less pain during sex. Being relaxed is extremely important to sex, because if you’re stressed, it’s very difficult to feel safe during a vulnerable experience like sex.

Cannabinoids have the power to reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression when used in the right amounts. For those who find that THC actually causes them some anxiety, CBD is another option to consider. It’s effective at bringing on relaxation and it isn’t psychoactive.

Cannabis and the orgasm.

The orgasm; another phenomenon to be affected by the use of cannabis — or at least, a lot of people say it does. In this study, a whopping 65% of those who used cannabis before sex reported an improved orgasm as one of the effects, in both men and women. 

There is a very key difference between the run of the mill orgasm and the life-changing orgasm. I can’t say I know what it is, I just know a life-changing orgasm when I get one. One of the consequences of the psychological effects of THC is increased physical sensitivity. This is likely the phenomenon behind the amazing orgasm that cannabis is seemingly able to inspire.

But it’s not that cannabis produces a great orgasm. One can’t just smoke a spliff and explode into orgasmic bliss (maybe it happens in metaphorical ways). Which means there’s something else behind it too. Cannabis users often report a sense of increased interpersonal connectedness after using it. This apparent ability to connect seamlessly with the person you’re sharing intimate space with is surely linked to the improvement of the orgasm.

For some people cannabis can cause these feelings of increased connectedness. It doesn’t happen for everybody (some people feel anxious after using THC), which is why it’s important to feel that way if cannabis is at all going to make your orgasm better. It’s important to know yourself and how you respond to cannabis, instead of taking this as meaning that everybody can enjoy a better orgasm with cannabis.

The most important part of your sex life: your libido.

A black and white image of a couple in bed

At the end of the day, the most important thing in your sex life is your libido. Without it, you’re not having sex, and without it you’re probably not enjoying sex very much if you are doing it. And this is also the place where cannabis use is a little bit controversial.

In the study published in Sexual Medicine already mentioned, women also reported increased sex drive. It’s been noted in this study, too. Cannabis, when used correctly and in the right amounts, obviously gets a lot of people in the right mood for sex.

But there is a caveat.

This lesser-spoken-about topic lurks in the dark undergrowth of cannabis conversation. After a long time of chronic cannabis use, your libido can somehow get lost. This is lesser studied in terms of scientific research, but in this study, researchers noted that 26% of cannabis-dependent users who were abstaining reported an increased sex drive. 

Now, it might be a minority of people for whom this happens — you use weed for a long time and then you wake up one day and realise you haven’t felt horny in ages. But it is a very real possibility for a lot of people. In this study published in the Psychology of Addictive Behaviours, researchers noticed that couples in which both people smoked cannabis showed a decreasing trend in conflict resolution over time. This substantiates the idea that something happens between partners (and this could theoretically be extended into non-committed sexual encounters) that negatively affects relationship outcomes (such as sex) after a long time with an addictive relationship towards cannabis.

That’s why it’s really important to think about cannabis and sex in two ways. There’s using cannabis in your life, and of course having sex from time to time. Or there’s using cannabis from time to time before sex or using it only before sex and having a mind blowing experience.

Cannabis can enhance a person’s libido and sex life, but for a lot of people, if cannabis the main event in their life, libodo and sexual arousal can be negatively impacted. 

Finally, let’s talk about dose.

The dose of cannabis is really important to the sexual experience, but it’s also the easiest thing to control, so that’s also why I left it to the end. It’s really simple — don’t use too much of it, especially if THC is your chosen cannabinoid.

Every seasoned cannabis user has accidentally used too much cannabis before. It’s not nice. You can feel anxious, paranoid, nauseous, dizzy — nothing that’s conducive to sex. 

Now I want you to think about the dose of cannabis that typically brings you to that point of disaster. Now, your dose before sex should be at most, ÂĽ of that dose. 

If 50mg of THC gets you sufficiently blasted, consider a sexy dose to be somewhere around 15 or 20 mg. You can always take more. But you can’t go back once you’re a floppy bag of limbs trying to be sexy.

5 Tips from a herbalist on using cannabis with sex

A gay couple sharing intimacy in bed

Here are my tips on using cannabis with sex to make it work for your sex life and not against it. 

#1: Don’t treat weed like it’s your partner — if you’re more interested in using cannabis than you are in having sex, cannabis won’t make your sex life any better.

#2: Keep the dose modest — I recommend keeping the dose between 5 and 20 mg of THC, and no more than 50 mg of CBD.

#3: Make it a thing — the same way you would make date night a thing. Make a point of feeling sexy and taking cannabis consciously together with the purpose of enhancing your sexual experience. Make it romantic, too!

#4: Mix it up — try different forms of cannabis consumption like edibles and tinctures to mix it up. You might find that there are certain formulas that make you feel sexier than others or certain strains that make you feel sexier than others. Don’t be afraid to mix it up and experiment with different things.

And of course, the most important thing is enjoy it! 

How has cannabis affected you in the bedroom? We’d love to hear from you in the comments.

Sex-based differences in the effects of therapeutics is a relatively new aspect of modern scientific research. Biological sex accounts for many of the variations in the effects of different therapeutics, including cannabis. 

Important info: We’re strictly talking about biological sex in this article, and not the myriad of genders.

Science has confirmed a number of ways in which cannabinoids exert a different effect on both men and women. For example, cannabinoids primarily affect women in terms of anxiety and depression, whereas they affect men in terms of energy production and metabolism. Science is starting to show that gonadal hormones play a crucial role in the sex-based differences in cannabinoid effects.

What we’re noticing in this research is a difference in the way men and women respond to cannabis, including the ways in which they develop addictive tendencies towards cannabis. The understanding of how cannabis affects different biological sexes differently gives the medical community better opportunities for using cannabis therapeutically. And of course, a better understanding of how to get optimal results from men and women.

Men, women, and cannabis addiction.

A woman rolls a cannabis joint.

Interestingly, in some preclinical studies, researchers found that female rats (as compared to male rats) were more sensitive to the rewarding and reinforcing effects of THC. This was later corroborated in a human trial. In another preclinical study, female rats were more likely to engage in cue/stress-induced cannabis use. This naturally leads researchers to believe that cannabis may be more addictive for women than for men, at least biologically speaking. To add to this, women are more likely to experience more frequent and severe withdrawal symptoms, all of which predict relapse in women who are trying to quit cannabis.

With that in mind, men consume a greater volume of cannabis than women do, and are less likely to be only cannabis users. That’s to say, they’re more likely to use other drugs alongside cannabis. How much that affects the addictiveness of cannabis, we don’t really know.

In short — women are much more likely to use cannabis when they’re stressed, whereas men don’t seem to mind using it all of the time. And strangely enough, that puts women at greater risk of developing addictive tendencies towards cannabis.

Endocannabinoid system differences between men and women.

Murine research showed that men express a greater number of CB1 receptors in all brain regions except for the amygdala — where women express more CB1 receptors. On the contrary, despite the fact that men expressed a greater volume of CB1 receptors, females’ receptors displayed heightened activity compared to males. 

An interesting pre-clinical study took place in 2016 that investigated the effects of early life stressors on the endocannabinoid system. Early life stress increased CB receptor expression in females, but not in males. This is especially interesting because we know the endocannabinoid system is heavily implicated in stress disorders such as PTSD. Thus, a better understanding of cannabinoid expression in men and women is warranted through further research. 

Sex steroids and gonadal hormones are thought to be highly interconnected with the endocannabinoid system, and with the variations in effects between men and women. This all comes as a consequence of earlier cannabis research, where we learned that women have different CBR expressions during different times in their menstrual cycle

There have been a number of other studies in endocannabinoid system differences between men and women, but their results have been conflicting. While some have reported that men have a greater number of CB1 receptors, others report that this title belongs to women. As the research is still in early days, it’s necessary to acquire bigger sample sizes and more consistency across studies.

Other factors we sometimes forget to consider.

 

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In this article, we focused mainly on the biological differences between men and women, and how those factors interplay with cannabis use. But there are also social factors that contribute to the differences in cannabis effects — including gender.

Gender is a part and parcel of many other social and psychological constructs that we are a part of. Gender along with identity, institution, social roles, and relationships all play a role in how we respond to cannabis, even if we haven’t proven this biologically. For example, a person raised in a nuclear family who attended Christian institutions may have a completely different response to cannabis than a child raised in foster homes who is emancipated from his biological family. And these differences in the response to cannabis aren’t necessarily based on biological differences, but in different social practises, traditions, and understandings.

This is relevant to biological sex too, because we observe men and women playing different roles in society, identifying with different jobs and family roles, and having different relationships. When we study populations, we necessarily must include the social factors that affect these populations. Thus, when studying cannabis’ effects on men and women, we should also consider the different social factors that affect men and women — like identity, gender, and roles.

Even if the research is still lacking in this aspect of cannabis research, it’s a particularly interesting aspect nonetheless. This kind of research is what paves the way for using cannabis to treat disorders that are particular to men and women such as prostate cancer or endometriosis.

We would love to hear your experiences with cannabis for male or female related problems. Let us know in the comments!

There’s a lot of contention surrounding cannabis and the way it affects our sex lives.

You might recall the first few joints of your teenage years, and the sexual feelings that came with them. It’s not uncommon for people to report increased feelings of sexual desire or overall improved sex after consuming cannabis. It gets all of your parts tingling in just the right way. 

But did you know that erectile dysfunction is as much as two times more likely in men that use cannabis compared to men who don’t? There is a lot of evidence that shows a connection between cannabis and erectile dysfunction.

This isn’t a cathartic blog article about the dangers of cannabis — let the record show that smoking cannabis from time to time will not cause erectile dysfunction. However, if you’re a heavy cannabis user experiencing erectile dysfunction, it might be time to consider other forms of therapy or recreation. 

Let’s check out what science has to say about cannabis and erectile dysfunction.

What is erectile dysfunction and what causes it?

An all-male couple sharing intimacy

Erectile dysfunction is essentially the inability to get an erection or to maintain one for long enough to have sex. It’s not the same as premature ejaculation or decreased libido. It’s purely a dysfunction of the erectile ability of the penis.

Each man, at some point in his life, will experience some kind of erectile dysfunction. If it occurs rarely, or as a once-off, it’s not typically a cause for concern. However, for some men, there is the ongoing inability to achieve or maintain an erection, and it’s at this point that it becomes clinical.

There are a lot of contributing factors to erectile dysfunction. Certain health conditions such as heart diseases and diabetes can cause erectile dysfunction, as can some medications. Tobacco use, which restricts blood flow to veins and arteries can also lead to conditions that cause erectile dysfunction. Severe emotional disorders such as depression, anxiety, or low self-esteem can also lead to erectile dysfunction. 

As we’re coming to learn, cannabinoids might cause erectile dysfunction because of the way that cannabinoid receptors are distributed in the hypothalamus – which is the part of the brain that regulates erectile functions. Let’s check out some of the science behind this theory.

Cannabis, erectile dysfunction, and science.

There has been a tremendous amount of research into cannabis’ effect on female sexual health, but unfortunately, the same attention hasn’t been given to cannabis’ effect on men’s sexual health. Which means our understanding of it is still preliminary.

In the only systematic review and meta-analysis on the topic, researchers found that erectile dysfunction was twice as prevalent in men who used cannabis than men who didn’t. However, the studies compiled for this meta-analysis typically had small sample sizes, and no definition was given for “cannabis user”. It wasn’t clear whether the cannabis-using men were heavy users or recreational users. 

In another review, scientists highlighted the inconsistencies between study results, pointing out that cannabis may enhance the subjective sexual experience, but might contribute to erectile dysfunction in a dose-dependent manner. Essentially, the writers of this study suggested that the dose was a factor in the inconsistencies between studies and probably plays a large role in whether cannabis will or will not cause erectile dysfunction.

In earlier research, scientists pointed out the distribution of cannabinoid receptors in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. This part of the brain regulates erectile function, and it is dense with cannabinoid receptors. Cannabinoids binding to these receptors and disrupting the normal functioning of that part of the brain is one plausible mechanism for how cannabis might lead to erectile dysfunction. Interestingly, this is the exact same reason why cannabis can improve erectile dysfunction in men who experience depression, anxiety, or pain.

The research presented nearly covers the entirety of research on the topic of cannabis and erectile dysfunction. If you browse through other research about cannabis and male sexual health (such as sperm quality), you’ll also find the same inconsistencies and question marks. Much more research is necessary to elucidate the plausible explanations for cannabis and erectile dysfunction if there exist any at all.

Men with erectile dysfunction: don’t despair.

A man and woman lay naked after sex.

There are plenty of gaps in scientific research on this topic, so it’s important for men (and women) to take it all with a grain of salt. You shouldn’t be retiring from your favourite pastime or creative inspiration because of the fear of developing erectile dysfunction. But if you are a heavy cannabis user and you’re experiencing erectile dysfunction, it might be worth trying a break from cannabis. 

Interestingly, if you’re one of the men who suffer from erectile dysfunction because of depression or anxiety, cannabis might actually be able to improve your situation. In any case, there are medicines for erectile dysfunction such as Viagra and herbal medicine. There are counselling services available for men who believe their erectile dysfunction has an emotional origin.

Given the legalization of cannabis in multiple countries across the world, it’s becoming increasingly important to research the effect it has on men’s sexual health. We certainly look forward to learning more about this topic.

Have you experienced sexual health problems from using cannabis? We’d love to hear from you in the comments below.

You might even wonder why such an article needs to be written anymore. After all, it’s 2020, and cannabis is as mainstream as craft beer, so why should cannabis users have any problem in the world of dating? At the same time, if you clicked on this article, it’s because some profound part of you believes that yeah, cannabis users definitely have difficulties finding a partner.

It’s not that far-fetched, is it, that a stranger should judge someone based on their personal choices and preferences about what they choose to do with their bodies? Come on, that pretty much defines the crux of the human condition. So yes, cannabis users can, and often are, on the receiving end of a lot of judgement in the quest for romance. 

Dating is a world of ideals, and that’s what makes dating hard, whether you’re a cannabis user or not. Because before you log in to Tinder or OKCupid, you’ve already got some idea of who your “ideal” future partner is. And legalization or not, cannabis use isn’t usually a prerequisite for the ideal partner — and it gets less ideal when you admit that you smoke regularly.

So what’s the way around this?

That’s what we’re talking about in this article. The way around these dating difficulties for cannabis users is usually all about honesty and integrity. It’s usually more about how you communicate with the person you’re dating rather than stopping cannabis all together. So let’s have a look at some of these difficulties and what we can do about them.

Should you tell people you smoke cannabis on the first date?

A pair of hands cover eyes, representing a blind date.

If you’re using online dating platforms, then the “first date” is essentially what you write on your profile.

So should you be open about your cannabis consumption from the very beginning?

Obviously, if you’re going to show up to your first date high, then you might as well admit it from the beginning. Otherwise, it could get awkward.

Interestingly, apps like Tinder and OKCupid generally present themselves as cannabis-friendly. But there are a lot of Tinder users who swear that their volume of matches decreases when they add cannabis use to their profiles. And on their very own blog, OKCupid admitted that “weed is a dating deal-breaker”. Interestingly, in the same blog post, OKCupid reveals some data that suggests that the less okay their users were with drugs, the more okay they were with God.

Things aren’t looking good for cannabis users, are they?

Well, the answer is pretty clear.  If you use online dating services, you are, quite simply, less likely to get views. If you are looking for a high quantity of people you can date or meet, or even just have the chance to meet, then you should probably keep your cannabis consumption quiet. But this has its own caveats. Like for example, you’ll have to admit it at some point down the track. 

Would you date someone that uses drugs?

If you’re a cannabis user, you probably wouldn’t use the term “drug” to refer to cannabis. But a lot of those online dating profiles belong to people who have never used intoxicants before, and to them, cannabis is drugs. 

Now, it’s fun to ask yourself this as a cannabis user. Would you date someone that uses drugs if those drugs weren’t cannabis? For example, if you met someone you thought was pretty attractive, and all-round, you wanted to get to know them better, but they disclosed to you that every afternoon, they liked to do a round of cocaine — would you still date them?

Your answer to this question is irrelevant to us, but it’s very relevant to you. How did you feel being asked that question? Whatever you were feeling or thinking is likely to be close to what other, non-cannabis users are thinking when they are asked that very same question. 

You might be totally OK with dating someone who uses cannabis, the same way a non-cannabis user probably has no problem dating someone who drinks a glass of wine every night. But you just might have a problem with someone who likes cocaine as a snack after lunch — the same way someone who just likes to drink wine might have a problem with you smoking a joint as a midnight snack.

Is dating all about judgements?

A judgmental cat stares at the camera.

The sad answer is — yes. Of course it is.

You can’t know someone inside out on the first date. Everything you think you know is pretty much just a judgement in those formative days… which is why it’s important to be a good judge of character.

There’s really no reason to sugar coat it. If someone refuses to date you because you use cannabis, they are judging you for the fact that you use cannabis. But is that something to get upset about?

No.

People make these judgements everyday based on how they can move forward in their lives. Workplaces have to make these judgements before employing people, and even security makes this judgement before letting you into an event. So you should undoubtedly be making these judgements when you’re deciding who you’re going to date, especially in case you accidentally end up pro-creating with them.

What are your priorities?

The biggest dating difficulty that a cannabis user confronts is in deciding what’s most important to them. No cannabis user wants to be judged (no one wants to be judged), especially about their cannabis use. But what happens if you fall in love so deeply that it’s actually worth quitting cannabis?

See, all this gets pretty messy, because if someone really wants to date you, they shouldn’t ask you to give up something that’s really important to you. And you might decide just that — you don’t want to be with someone whose request is that unreasonable. And that’s fair enough. Because obviously, what you want is just as important as what your potential match wants.

It reminds me of a time near the end of high school, when my ballet teacher told me I should either give up ballet or give up smoking. Needless to say, I gave up ballet. But these are the kinds of priorities I’m talking about — what’s most important to you, now?

This really is the biggest dating difficulty, because cannabis users also want to date, fall in love, be promiscuous and have fun. All of these things are equally as important as being able to smoke cannabis freely around your partner.

Which brings us to the inevitable question…

Are cannabis users destined to date other cannabis users?

A couple holds hands as they walk.

That would certainly make dating easier, wouldn’t it? It’s not always that simple, because what if you just don’t find another cannabis user of your preferred gender that you like enough to date? But in any case, a cannabis user is safest with another cannabis user — at least that’s a thing that you’ll never judge each other about.

Having to explain yourself as a cannabis user to someone who doesn’t use it is taxing, and it’s so tedious. It’s much nicer just to be accepted for who you are, which is infinitely easier for someone who has at least tried cannabis before. And so maybe cannabis users are destined to date other cannabis users or other have-been cannabis users.

There is an element of understanding there, the same way that an artist may want to date another artist. It’s not so much about keeping the status quo — it’s just more practical and often makes more sense than a CEO dating a street artist. There has to be a certain level of reciprocity between the two people, not just sexually, but in terms of their interests, goals, and passions.

And why should it be any different with cannabis? You can have a completely successful life, even as a cannabis user, so you would have to really, really, really, love someone to spend your life trying to persuade them that your cannabis use is OK.

There are really no rules when it comes to dating (other than consent, which is a really important rule), it’s all about what everyone wants. And at the very, very crux of that, one thing will always remain true:

If you want to smoke cannabis, no one can really convince you otherwise. And if someone really doesn’t want their partner to smoke cannabis, you can’t change their minds either. 

So don’t hide who you are to your potential mates. You should flaunt yourself, in all of your cannabis smoking beauty, for the person who wants you. And then you’ll never have to convince or persuade them of anything. 

Have you encountered dating difficulties as a cannabis user? How did you get around them? We want to hear from you in the comments!